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Aranyaka

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Aranyaka
The Aranyakas (; Sanskrit: ) are the ritual sacrifice part of the ancient Indian texts, the Vedas. They typically represent the earlier sections of Vedas, and are one of many layers of the Vedic texts. The other parts of Vedas are the Samhitas (benedictions, hymns), Brahmanas (commentary), Upasanas (worship), and the Upanishads (spirituality and abstract philosophy).

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WordNet 2.0 Dictionary

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Aranyaka

Noun
1. a treatise resembling a Brahmana but to be read or expounded by anchorites in the quiet of the forest
(hypernym) Vedic literature, Veda


Rakefet Dictionary

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Aranyaka
Aranyaka (Sanskrit) [from aranya forest-like from aranya wilderness, forest] Forest-born; a hermit or holy man who dwells in the forest during the process of becoming a genuine spiritual yogi. Aranyakas (plural) are a class of Vedic treatises of a mystical nature attached to the Brahmanas and closely associated with the Upanishads. They were called such either because they were written in the solitude of the wilderness or because they were intended for study and contemplation by those who had retired from the world to lead the life of spiritual recluses. The Aranyakas are ritualistic, treating of special ceremonies either omitted or dealt with only in part in the Brahmanas, and hence are considered to be supplemental to the latter.
Only four Aranyakas are presently known to exist: the Aitareya (Rig-vedic) forming part of the Aitareya-Brahmana; the Kausitaki (Rig-vedic) whose third and final chapter is the Kanusitaki Upanishad; the Taittiriya, of ten books, belonging to the Yajur-Veda; and the Brihad (Yajur-Veda) which forms a part of the Brihadaranyaka Upanishad attached to the Satapatha-Brahmana.



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